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Old 20 Mar 2016, 23:24 (Ref:3625330)   #1
Jan E-28
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Jan E-28 should be qualifying in the top 10 on the grid
Right way to line gearbox against final drive?

A mechanic told me that you can lose a lot of hp if you line the engine straight toward the final drive if the engine/gear is not installed dead.
The installation can also steal a lot of torque if not lined correct. And itís also more prone to get vibrations.

So my question is how should the engine/gear be lined up against the final drive when you use rubber bushings for mounts?
Is it different if the car is used on street, track or drag also?

Maybe someone even have a document describing it in a good way?
I have only found this.
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Old 27 Mar 2016, 21:10 (Ref:3627875)   #2
SidewaysFeltham
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SidewaysFeltham should be qualifying in the top 5 on the gridSidewaysFeltham should be qualifying in the top 5 on the grid
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Originally Posted by Jan E-28 View Post
A mechanic told me that you can lose a lot of hp if you line the engine straight toward the final drive if the engine/gear is not installed dead.
The installation can also steal a lot of torque if not lined correct. And itís also more prone to get vibrations.

So my question is how should the engine/gear be lined up against the final drive when you use rubber bushings for mounts?
Is it different if the car is used on street, track or drag also?

Maybe someone even have a document describing it in a good way?
I have only found this.
In an engineering approach, quite obviously, a Cardan Shaft induces a range of energy losses, caused by the inert friction of the joints and spurious vibrations and harmonics.

Much on this topic here:

https://www.google.co.uk/?gws_rd=ssl...lignment+rules

A standard automobile is a compromise between performance, minimising physical wear and reduction of noise. Which is precisely why Silentbloc and Metalastic rubber-metal bonded flexible mountings were invented. For precision and reduction of "vagueness" racing cars of all classes tended towards solid mounts.

The trick is to design a system of power delivery between the gearbox and rear axle which is as direct as possible.

Unfortunately, "Live Axles" which move vertically and laterally, demand some tolerance; hence some form of universal joint.

If you consider front wheel drive vehicles, then the drive shaft which is obviously transmitting the power must be designed to move up and down, as the suspension compresses and droops, and, more critically, the shaft must allow rotational movement as steering is applied.

The Hooke Joint was modified to create a Constant Velocity Joint (CVJ).

If you need the applicable maths, then here it is!

http://rsnr.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/61/2/219

http://what-when-how.com/automobile/...ts-automobile/

Hope this assists.
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