Home Forum T-Shirts etc.: Europe/Worldwide. eBay Motorsport Links Advertising Live Chat  
Site Partners: OldRacingCars.com  

Go Back   TenTenths Motorsport Forum > Historic Racing & Motorsport History > Motorsport History > The Driver Files


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 27 May 2001, 01:59 (Ref:97073)   #1
TimD
Veteran
 
TimD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
United Kingdom
Derbyshire Peak District, United Kingdom
Posts: 3,797
TimD should be qualifying in the top 3 on the gridTimD should be qualifying in the top 3 on the gridTimD should be qualifying in the top 3 on the grid
David Bruce-Brown

I've heard the name, and I've heard tell of his great exploits on the Fiat in the Savannah Grand Prize, but there really is very little information available on this enigmatic driver.

Can anyone offer me a potted biography or some stories about a driver who I am told could have achieved so much if his career had not been cut so short?
TimD is offline  
Quote
Old 27 May 2001, 05:57 (Ref:97109)   #2
Hans Etzrodt
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Bruce-Brown, born 1890, was a wealthy New Yorker who had attended Yale. While still attending schooling he set a speed record of 109 mph in Daytona Beach in 1908. The following year he acquired a 120 hp Benz to participate at races. Besides minor events during the year he won the 1910 American Grand Prize in Savannah. He was a born race driver if ever there was one. In May of 1911, he finished 3rd in the first Indy 500. At the end of the year he again won the American Grand Prize in a FIAT S74. He returned to Indy in 1912 but retired early. Then followed the French GP at Dieppe, where he led for the first 13 of 20 laps, then ran out of fuel and still came third, losing out on a technicality.

The same year at the end of practice for the American Grand Prize at Milwaukee, he requested extra practice laps from famous starter Fred Wagner. Wagner, who saw that the FIAT's tires were worn down to the fabric, ordered Bruce-Brown to return to the garage. Wagner: "It is my honest belief that David Bruce-Brown would be alive today, to cite a case in point, had he heeded the warning I gave him on that fateful afternoon when he rolled to his death." A rear tire blew, causing his FIAT to flip, burying Bruce-Brown. They finally got the car off him but he passed away on the awful ride to hospital. Tony Scudelari, his mechanic, died one week later.
 
Quote
Old 27 May 2001, 14:55 (Ref:97252)   #3
Ray Bell
Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location:
Various parts of Australia
Posts: 2,221
Ray Bell should be qualifying in the top 10 on the grid
Would his 1910 Savannah win make him the youngest every winner of an event of Grand Epreuve stature?
Ray Bell is offline  
Quote
Old 27 May 2001, 23:18 (Ref:97492)   #4
Hans Etzrodt
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Very good question, Ray.

You could start a new thread on this, actually an interesting topic.
 
Quote
Old 28 May 2001, 00:55 (Ref:97538)   #5
Ray Bell
Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location:
Various parts of Australia
Posts: 2,221
Ray Bell should be qualifying in the top 10 on the grid
I remember reading about him years ago... was it in the Charles Faroux book?

Might start that thread, Hans...
Ray Bell is offline  
Quote
Old 28 May 2001, 23:14 (Ref:98065)   #6
Hans Etzrodt
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
I looked further into the Bruce-Brown story and discovered unresolved controversy regarding his age, which could have been either 19, 20 or 22.
  • Peter Helck (1961 and again 1983) wrote that Bruce-Brown was 24, when he died on 1 October 1912. This means he was born before October 1888 and at the time of his first American Grand Prize win on 12 November 1910, he was actually 22.
  • G N Georgano & Cyril Posthumus (1971) show him to be born in 1890, which makes him either 19 or 20 at the time of his first American Grand Prize win.
  • Robert Cutter and Bob Fendell (1973) wrote that he was born 1890 and refer to him as 18-year-old on March 23 1908, when he set a record speed of 109 mph at Daytona. Conclusion, he must have been born before March 23 1890. That makes him 20 at the time of his first American Grand Prize win.
  • Tim Considine (1997) states that he was born 1890, which would make him either 19 or 20 at the time of his first American Grand Prize win.

    I believe that David Bruce-Brown was the youngest ever to win a major event.
 
Quote
Old 29 May 2001, 22:53 (Ref:98535)   #7
Vitesse
Veteran
 
Vitesse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
United Kingdom
Bath, England
Posts: 785
Vitesse should be qualifying in the top 10 on the gridVitesse should be qualifying in the top 10 on the grid
This is only a possiblity, and just a theory, but perhaps someone in the USA could check it out ...

If anyone can provide info as to where Bruce-Brown was living in either 1900 or 1910, United States Census information for those years is already in the public domain. I've checked the appropriate web site, but personal information is only available on microfiche in major libraries, not on the web. Plus, of course, I don't know whether or not birth dates were recorded on US censuses - I have established that they do include place of birth . However, this might be worth exploring - anyone?
Vitesse is offline  
__________________
Good friends we have, Oh, good friends we have lost
Along the way.
In this great future, You can't forget your past

Bob Marley
Quote
Old 30 May 2001, 02:58 (Ref:98603)   #8
Liz
Veteran
 
Join Date: Feb 1999
Location:
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 12,451
Liz should be qualifying in the top 10 on the gridLiz should be qualifying in the top 10 on the grid
Tim, my cousin found some info for you on the 1911 Indy race. Here it is........ David Bruce-Brown drove #28 Fiat/EE Hewlett sponsor, Engine type Fiat 1-4/589cu in started 25 and finished 3rd, he lead for much of the half of the 200 laps.
Liz is offline  
__________________
"If we won all the time, we'd be as unpopular as Ferrari, and we want to avoid that. We enjoy being a team that everybody likes." Flavio Briatore
Quote
Old 30 May 2001, 04:25 (Ref:98620)   #9
Hans Etzrodt
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Thank you, Liz.
Any reference to his age?
 
Quote
Old 30 May 2001, 10:56 (Ref:98715)   #10
Ray Bell
Veteran
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location:
Various parts of Australia
Posts: 2,221
Ray Bell should be qualifying in the top 10 on the grid
Sorry folks, said Charles Faroux book, meant Charles Fox book, and he isn't in there. Just found my copy.

What book was it that had a nice feature on him? It was a book that gave bios of about a dozen drivers through the years...
Ray Bell is offline  
Quote
Old 16 Apr 2006, 13:43 (Ref:1584978)   #11
Corktree
Rookie
 
Join Date: Mar 1999
United States
Posts: 52
Corktree should be qualifying in the top 10 on the grid
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hans Etzrodt
Thank you, Liz.
Any reference to his age?
Very old news, but just in case....

The 2 October 1912 issue of The New York Times has the year of David Bruce Brown's birth as 1887.
Corktree is offline  
__________________
H. Donald Capps
“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.”
-- F. Scott Fitzgerald // "Popular memory is not history...." -- Gordon Woods
Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
In memory of Jim Bruce 275 GTB-4 Motorsport History 4 19 Feb 2003 12:38


Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT. The time now is 22:01.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Original Website Copyright © 1998-2003 Craig Antil. All Rights Reserved.
Ten-Tenths Motorsport Forums Copyright © 2004-2016 Royalridge Computing. All Rights Reserved.