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Old 13 Nov 2015, 21:15 (Ref:3590234)   #16
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gt917 should be qualifying in the top 3 on the gridgt917 should be qualifying in the top 3 on the gridgt917 should be qualifying in the top 3 on the grid
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If I remember right it was a very close race between Peter Baldwin (JK) v Bill Sollis (KAD) and the KAD Mini won?
Seeing this mention of Pete Baldwin .......................

The famous FORC club have him as the guest speaker at the usual big do on Wednesday night, This is going to be a good un.

Any one interested, get on to FORCLUB website straight away, just in case there are a couple of seats left.
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Old 17 Dec 2015, 21:13 (Ref:3598457)   #17
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Jon Mowatt:

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Originally Posted by mab01UK View Post

(Back in the 1980's I used to have our road and race Mini's set up on Jon Mowatt's Rolling Road in Essex......Mowatts still comes up on a google search is Jon still around and in business?)
I last met Jon a few years ago: he had moved from running his gargae and tuning business, increasingly into haulage.

Sadly, he suffered a coranary and lost his full racing license, but - typical Jon! - persuaded the regulators to grant him a limited license for hill climbs and was then occasionally, campaigning a venerable Morgan. Plus, he was deeply involved in radio controlled model aircraft.

Interestingly, as my maternal grandmother's maiden name was Mowatt, Jon and I decided we were distant cousins!

His grandfather was apparently the black sheep of the family and went to sea. Clearly, this is here Jon inheritated his genetics!

We also used Jon's road for a bit; however I then (Circa 1971) installed a state-of-the-art Heenan-Froude (Crypton) water brake which could absorb up to 300 bhp at the wheels and was extremely accurate, whereas Jon's brake was an old Sun paddle air brake.

My road could thus deal with American "Muscle Cars" happily.

I used to regularly see Jon around the circuits in the early 1970s as despite the dominance of the 1300 Escorts at that time, Jon's full-works spec 1293s could on a good day, give 'em a run for their money!

Glyn Swift: another name from the past: Glyn was the only guy I ever knew who didn't bother to tie down his race Mini on the trailer. Couldn't be bothered. Until one fine day on the way to Lyddon or Brands at his usual speed, the car fell off.............

Ooops!



In the early '70s, my team Felspeed Racing, ran a 997s, in special saloons: this had been exchanged with a charming American guy called Ed McDonnagh, for a Lotus Formula Ford we had kicking around. (Ed later distinguished himself by writing off Norman Abbott's BDA Escort at Silverstone when going rather quickly).

Felspeed's 999s was unusual then as it was non-cross-flow. I asked my chum Bruce Renny (who had built the increadibly powerful Twink for our Formula Atlantic) to sort out the Min. He hated BMC engines with a Caladonian passion! Howver sort of emulated screamer F3 approach, re-jigged the inlet ports and we finished up with two DCOE 45s milled in half (i.e. one straight port for each siamesed inlet) and it was a rocket! Fastest non-crossflow in the country then. pulled happily to 10K RPM without bursting.

A beam axle rear ( A la Abbott) finished the development.

Noisy little S*d, though! Had a Jack Knight pawl type LimSlip. The first time I tested it at Silverstone, on the club circuit, the straight bit was covered with small puddles.................and the Min hit these and leaped sideways at speed ((and the revs soared!) until grip was re-established.

Frightened me to death until I realised what was happening.
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Old 17 Dec 2015, 23:28 (Ref:3598476)   #18
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Originally Posted by SidewaysFeltham View Post
In the early '70s, my team Felspeed Racing, ran a 997s, in special saloons: this had been exchanged with a charming American guy called Ed McDonnagh, for a Lotus Formula Ford we had kicking around. (Ed later distinguished himself by writing off Norman Abbott's BDA Escort at Silverstone when going rather quickly).
Was that the pink Escort with 2.1 litre twin cam and Hewland gearbox/transaxle at the rear? I thought that was damaged by John Emmin somewhere then sold to Chris Meek and run as the Princess Ita Escort.
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Old 18 Dec 2015, 18:41 (Ref:3598638)   #19
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Dunno!

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Originally Posted by morninggents View Post
Was that the pink Escort with 2.1 litre twin cam and Hewland gearbox/transaxle at the rear? I thought that was damaged by John Emmin somewhere then sold to Chris Meek and run as the Princess Ita Escort.
I wasn't there at the time. The source of this information, was our then demon engine builder, Bruce Renney, who having started on MAEs et al in the screamer era of F3, had moved on to Twinks and then FVAs/FVCs and knew Norman Abbott quite well. I believe they bought and sold parts and service work to and from each other.

Bruce was the original Mr Lugubrious!

Perhaps Abbott rebuilt the car and it wasn't damaged as badly as first thought?


Corrigendum:

Ed's correct surname is McDonogh, ex racer of distinction and now an eminent journalist and author on the sport.
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Old 1 Feb 2016, 23:34 (Ref:3610744)   #20
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Some more of my photos of the late Chris Tyrrell - Mini Seven Champion 1974, 1986 and 1987.








Last edited by mab01UK; 1 Feb 2016 at 23:39.
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Old 14 Feb 2016, 10:01 (Ref:3614582)   #21
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Some more photos of Chris Tyrrell and his Mini 7.







(Photos: Se7enthHeaven)
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Old 14 Feb 2016, 10:30 (Ref:3614587)   #22
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VIVA GT is going for a new lap record!VIVA GT is going for a new lap record!VIVA GT is going for a new lap record!VIVA GT is going for a new lap record!VIVA GT is going for a new lap record!VIVA GT is going for a new lap record!
Now, that's more how I remember it rather than that shiny red thing!
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Old 3 Sep 2016, 16:57 (Ref:3669407)   #23
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Early 1990's (I think) in paddock photos of my late brother Steve Bell (Wood & Pickett sponsored) and his then team mate Mickey Bray (also sadly no longer with us).







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Old 3 Sep 2016, 23:08 (Ref:3669699)   #24
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A couple more of my photos taken in the race paddock at Brands Hatch 31st July 1983......





(According to the DVLA website the red Minivan MUV 878L (May 1973) was last taxed in 24th Sept 1991 so looks like it lasted another 8 years).
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Old 26 Nov 2016, 00:53 (Ref:3691059)   #25
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Some more photos but fron the early 1990's.....

A few nice shots below taken by 'Pogie' of the Mini Forum (TMF) from the paddock of the 'Fastest Mini in the World' race that was held at Mini 35 at Silverstone in 1994.
"The green Autodelta Mini from Japan sadly wasn't allowed to race as it failed scrutineering on quite a few safety issues. The mechanics were working like mad to make up a bulkhead to separate the fuel tank from the driver but they run out of time. It was a shame it didn't run as it had loads of hi-tech features but you would have thought the builders would have checked the UK racing regulations before hauling the car halfway around the world. I doubt if so many race Minis of their type will be bought together in one race ever again."

In the end it was a very close and exciting race between Peter Baldwin (JK) v Bill Sollis (KAD) and the KAD Mini won.



















I was at the Silverstone race in 1994 but not sure if I took any photos.....but here is a photo below I took of the Jack Knight 16V Mini in the Brands Hatch paddock in the early 1990's.
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Old 27 Nov 2016, 19:45 (Ref:3691520)   #26
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Found a couple of my photos of the Delta Mini added below......





Sean Coles Mini-Ford....


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Old 3 Dec 2016, 00:27 (Ref:3693228)   #27
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Following on from the paddock photos posted earlier in this thread, I have scanned some on track action photos of my late brother Steve Bell's Mini Se7en (Wood & Pickett/Moss/Tyrrell - No.40) from the early 1990's.





















A copy of an advertising flyer from the Mike Bush /Steve Bell Wood & Pickett era in Epsom, Surrey.
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Old 4 Dec 2016, 23:16 (Ref:3693677)   #28
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and some on-track photos of the 'Fastest Mini in the World' Silverstone 1994.....





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Old 4 Mar 2019, 19:50 (Ref:3888270)   #29
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Nice set of B&W Photos of 1275GT Challenge from Brands Hatch.
(Photos: Paul Judge)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/paulju...7619204658976/















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Old 20 Mar 2019, 22:53 (Ref:3892327)   #30
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Article below from Motorsport Magazine - Page 46, August 1992


Small Is Beautiful
You know that Copse is quick, always have known it. And it became more of a challenge a few years ago, when they did away with the Silverstone short circuit beloved of slipstreaming Formula Fords (remember them arriving several abreast at the old Woodcote?), and added a few new fiddly bits suited to greater purity of racing line than the old who-can-be-last-on-the-brakes right-hander. The upshot is that the straight leading to Copse is now longer, approach speeds are higher and Silverstone's first corner has become more of a trap for the unwary.

In a Mini Seven, however, the level of commitment seems not to matter greatly. There always seem to be a few inches of track left that you could have utilised. And you don't so much steer a Mini Seven into Copse. You throw it. In too fast? Simple. Ease the throttle, and the rear end begins to break away ever so gently. It feels as though you have all the time in the world to correct the ensuing slide via a steering wheel which wouldn't look out of place in a Routemaster bus. During the relative calm of a midweek test session, it's worth lifting off at Copse just for the hell of it, make sure you weren't imagining it. Can a frontwheel drive car with such a tiny wheelbase really be so responsive, so progressive, so easy to manipulate via the throttle?
Time after time, you get the same answer.
Yes.
The car in question is Steve Bell's. Beautifully turned out in the colours of sponsor Wood & Pickett, it may be a close relation to the Mini Seven racers of the '70s in terms of technical presentation (although the previously specified 850 cc engine was junked at the end of 1990, in favour of a one-litre unit), but bodily it looks nothing like its forebears. The days of the scruffy Seven, wearing faded, battle-scarred BL paint and looking largely standard apart from the absence of wheel trims and emptiness of the ashtray have long gone. Mini Seven racing, originally the brainchild of the 750MC, which was looking to provide a cheap alternative to special saloon racing in the mid-'60s, is now into its 26th season. Nowadays, the series has official Rover support and the standard of car preparation is, generally speaking, absolutely superb. Bell's Mini, like those of most of his rivals, looks more suited to a concours than a 10-lap thrash around a muddy, wet Cadwell Park.

Despite the increased commitment to immaculate presentation, the Mini Seven series and its more powerful Mini Miglia cousin - of which more anon - remain relatively cost-effective in this day and age. Rover blessing, Unipart sponsorship and administrative assistance from the BRDC (which brings support race status at BTCC and British F3 rounds) help in this respect, of course, but a competitive Seven could cost anything between 2,500-4,500, the cost likely to vary according to individual technical ability and the quality of finish you are looking for in the end product. On top of that, Bell in his second season of Seven racing, although he's been around for a lot longer, usually wielding spanners for friends estimates that a 12-race season absorbs about 2,500 in running costs. Despite the car's propensity to slide around at the driver's whim, Bell got through just two full sets of Dunlop control tyres in 1991.There are only two tyre choices available - wet and dry, though the slicks are treaded - and Bell simply shifts the rubber from corner to corner during the year, according to rate of wear. "It represents value for money," believes Bell. "It's a good series, with close racing right down the field, and there's excellent camaraderie amongst the drivers." The latter aspect is not to be overlooked, either, in an age when suspicions about rivals' 'unfair' technical advantages are unhappily rife at many levels of the sport. Mini racing is happily devoid of protests.

The engine is almost fully race-prepared. The pistons are standard, balancing apart, and the head is pretty similar to that on a Miglia, albeit mildly strangled by the compulsory fitment of a 1.5 in restrictor plate. The camshaft is nicked from an MG Metro, and fuel is distributed via a single-choke carburettor, usually a 45 DCOE Weber with the jets soldered on one side. Maximum power, reckoned to lie somewhere between 70-80 bhp at the wheels, is delivered at 7400 rpm, although the engine will tolerate a few hundred revs more before the valves pogo through the bonnet. To maintain momentum, you need to keep the engine thrashing around between 6000 rpm and the aforementioned power peak.

The cacophonous result makes a pneumatic drill sound like a milk float, the aural assault amplified when the characteristic Mini transmission whine chimes in on backing vocals. Unfortunately, the transmission was more than just noisy on the day of our test. It was also a shade uncooperative. Bell warned that it was baulking at the change down from third to second for reasons unknown, which turned both Becketts and the complex running from Brooklands to Luffield into hit and miss affairs. The theory is that you turn in in second, feather the throttle (plant it too early, and you'll simply exit stage left in a frenzy of understeer) and get back hard on the power once the nose is firmly on course for the apex. The reality, on this particular day, was that you sailed into both corners thinking you were in second.
Leastways, I did.

Neutral is neither tractive nor accelerative; eventually, caution prevailed and both corners were taken in third, which completely wiped out any sensation of what either is really like. Copse, though, was worth waiting for, and brought back happy memories of being bounced around Mallory Park in a Seven some years ago, whilst conducting a similar exercise for Motoring News.
Trying to find one adjective to epitomise Seven racing is tricky.
Noisy? Not strong enough.
Bloody noisy, then? Accurate, but doesn't really convey what Sevens are like.
The most apposite description is probably 'moreish', although 'profitable' also springs to mind if you are any good at it. The combined Seven/Miglia prize fund is 13,000, and includes a road-going Mini Cooper for the driver with the highest overall points total in either series. For the past two seasons, Bill Sollis has outscored the Miglia champion in winning the Seven series outright, and has thus become the proud owner of two Coopers, albeit briefly. The Westerham fireman has sold on his prize on each occasion, the resulting income being put towards the subsequent racing campaign. This year, Sollis has used the assets accrued from trading in his Cooper prize for a season in Mini Miglia (a slightly fresher initiative, as it's only in its 22nd season...), which is less restrictive under the bonnet, although it shares many of the Seven's chassis and bodywork regulations (silhouettes must be kept standard, although lightening of subframes and other subtleties are permissible). Consequently, the Miglia is a costlier option than a Seven.

At Silverstone, we tried the front-running car of Richard Wager, which its proprietor felt still needed a little fine-tuning at this early point in the season. Wager is one of those who does much of the labour himself; by his assessment, a competitive car can be built or bought for around 5000, and running costs for the season are likely to be as much again.
Tyres, reckons Wager, are "expensive", for what they are, but like Seven counterpart Bell he reckons he can get by on eight per season. Again, control Dunlops are mandatory, and these must have at least 1.6 mm of tread at the start of a practice session or a race. Three compounds are available, and Wager uses a pick'n'mix selection: the softest at the rear, medium front right and hardest front left.

There are immediately obvious similarities between Sevens and Miglias, notably in the superb standards of presentation. Wager's car, like Bell's, was unblemished by grime. A Miglia field looks like a half-scale replica of the BTCC, thanks to commendable pride on the part of enthusiastic owner-drivers and not a little elbow grease.
And there are equally apparent differences. Although the Miglia just tops 100 bhp, the four-seconds-per-lap difference around Silverstone's 'national' circuit owes as much to greater braking efficiency and superior grip as it does to grunt. With a drag co-efficient similar to that of Ben Nevis, there are limits to how quickly a Mini will go in a straight line, even with the engine zinging along close to 8000 rpm in fourth (i.e. top) on the approach to Copse.

Where you throw a Seven into corner, a Miglia demands considerably greater precision. When the Dunlops lose grip, the Miglia breaks into more of a fidget than a slide. It's nothing like as progressive as its junior cousin, nor does it feel as tolerant of gorillaesque driving tactics. Nor, when it comes down to it, does it have the Seven's grin factor. It requires an altogether gentler, technically purer approach, though competitive Seven graduates such as Sollis have proved that it doesn't take long to master the Miglia technique. At the time of writing, Bill was third in the Miglia series. In touch, though not quite the required form to win a third straight Mini Cooper...

If there had to be any gearbox problems on the day, it was a shame that they struck the 'wrong' car. The Miglia has considerably greater torque, and third gear is fine for the tighter sections.
As this issue of MOTOR SPORT goes to press, there are four rounds of each championship still to run, at Snetterton (August 1/2), Mallory Park (August 23), Silverstone (August 31) and, lastly, Donington Park GP circuit (September 19/20).
After all these years, the Mini is still a source of some of the best circuit racing in the UK. Despite the proliferation of one-make alternatives, which grow by the year, the level of support for Mini racing, Seven or Miglia, has never once declined.

Its enduring popularity in these times of apparent recession isn't difficult to pinpoint. In the overall scheme of things, it is reasonably priced. It is as much fun to watch as it is to participate, and the paddock retains the happy-go-lucky flavour of the '60s, when the concept was originally launched.
Mini racers are as friendly a bunch as one could wish to meet. More power to their elbow grease.
SA
https://www.motorsportmagazine.com/a...mall-beautiful
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